Duterte asked to 'listen to people,' nix proposed 4th extension of martial law in Mindanao | Inquirer News
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Duterte asked to ‘listen to people,’ nix proposed 4th extension of martial law in Mindanao

/ 01:36 PM July 24, 2019

MANILA, Philippines — ACT Teachers Rep. France Castro on Wednesday said President Rodrigo Duterte should “listen to the Filipino people” and ignore the proposed fourth extension of martial law in Mindanao after it expires in December.

The opposition party-list lawmaker said some residents of Mindanao have repeatedly criticized the imposition of martial rule in the country’s southern region.

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“Instead of ‘listening to his men’, he should be listening to the people. Mas malakas at magiit ang mga boses ng ating mga kapatid na Moro, mga Lumad lalo na ang mga bata at gurong nagpupumilit lang na itaguyod ang karapatan sa edukasyon, mga pesante at magsasaka,” Castro said in a statement.

“Silang lahat ay biktima ng human rights violations sa ilalim ng martial law na ito. Because of these violations, martial law should not be extended even a day longer,” the lawmaker from the Makabayan bloc added.

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On Tuesday, National Security Adviser Hermogenes Esperon, Jr. said he would recommend the extension of martial law in Mindanao for another year due to the sustained rebellion in the region. Presidential Spokesperson Salvador Panelo assured that the President would listen to his men on the ground.

READ: One more year of martial law in Mindanao pushed | Palace: Duterte to ‘listen’ to his ‘men on the ground’ on Mindanao martial law extension

In June, Duterte’s daughter, Davao Mayor Sara Duterte-Carpio, said she would ask the Office of the President to lift martial law in her city even before it is set to expire on December 31, arguing that the security situation in her city and other areas in Mindanao have already improved.

READ: Military open to Inday Sara’s pitch to exempt Davao City from martial law

Castro said the “baseless” extension of martial law was “only an iron hand being foisted against the people who are merely fighting for their right against poverty, their right to a peaceful life based on justice.”

The Kabataan party-list meanwhile backed her, saying government should instead revive the peace negotiations and solve the root causes of armed conflict in the country by addressing issues in basic social services.

“Panawagan ng mga kabataan ay ibalik ang usapang pangkapayapaan at tugunan ang ugat ng armed conflict sa Mindanao. Dapat ding tugunan ng gobyerno ang kahirapan, kawalang trabaho at mga batayang serbisyong panlipunan,” the group said.

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The Chief Executive first declared martial law in Mindanao on May 23, 2017, after the Islamic State-inspired Maute terrorist group attacked Marawi City. He asked Congress for its extension until December of the same year. It was extended for the third time until Dec. 31, 2019.

READ: Congress okays 3rd martial law extension in Mindanao

Article VII Section 18 of the Constitution states that if there is “invasion or rebellion, when the public safety requires it,” the President may suspend the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus or place the Philippines or any part of it under martial law for not more than 60 days. But Congress may choose to extend or revoke it.  /muf

READ: Another martial law extension? Senators keeping an open mind

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TAGS: ACT Teachers, duterte, martial law extension, Mindanao, Rep. France Castro
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