Close  

Duterte assures public anew: No martial law abuses

/ 10:05 PM July 05, 2017
Rodrigo Duterte - Tagum - 50th founding anniversary of Davao del Norte

President Rodrigo Duterte (Photo from an RTVM video)

DAVAO CITY — President Duterte has assured the  public there is nothing to fear with the implementation of martial law in Mindanao even as he reiterated he would not allow abuses by security forces.

Mr. Duterte, during his visit to attend the 64th founding anniversary of the Hagonoy municipality in Davao del Sur, on Wednesday, said he was saddened that extreme measures had to be imposed under his administration following the violence committed by terrorists allied to the Islamic State of Syria and Iraq (ISIS) in Marawi City since May 23.

ADVERTISEMENT

“But rest assured there will be no abuses in times like this. I will not allow it,” the President said

The Chief Executive said the fighting in Marawi, which has been going on for over a month now and has claimed over 400 lives, prompted him to declare martial rule in an effort to stamp out terrorism which he considered worse than the 48-year-old communist insurgency.

FEATURED STORIES

“Although the fighting is winding up, but maybe we need more time to really clean the place (of terrorists),” Duterte said.

“I am very sad that this incident had to happen in the time when I’m the President because I am the second President of this republic to declare martial law,” he added.

Technically speaking, Duterte is the third.  In November 2009, then president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo placed the entire province of Maguindanao under martial law for several weeks following the massacre
of 58 people, mostly journalists, in Ampatuan town.

The late strongman Ferdinand Marcos imposed martial rule in the whole country from September 1972 to January 1981 to quell the simultaneous communist and Moro rebellions. Duterte could be considered the second president to declare martial law to quell a rebellion or terrorism, this time by the Maute Group and the Abu Sayyaf, covering many provinces or a large area such as Mindanao, the third of the three main island groups of the Philippines.

Mr. Duterte said the public could count on a professional military and police who “are well educated and well aware of their duty to the republic and to the Filipino people.”

Mr. Duterte also took a swipe anew at the communists as organized in the Communist Party of the Philippines, its armed wing the New People’s Army and its political wing, the National Democratic Front of the Philippines, describing the Maoist guerrillas as vacillating in their stand in negotiations with the Philippine government while continuing attacks against soldiers and police.

He said nothing beneficial would come out of the exchange of threats between the government and the insurgents.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Every time I see a dead soldier, (or) a dead NPA it pains me because they are both Filipinos. And we are fighting an issue which is a matter of principle,” the President said. SFM

Read Next
LATEST STORIES
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: abu sayyaf, Acts of terror, Armed conflict, clash, Communist Party of the Philippines, communist rebellion, counter-insurgency campaign, counter-insurgency operations, Counter-terrorism, Criminality, Encounter, Ferdinand Marcos, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, gun battle, Insurgency, ISIS, law enforcement, Maguindanao massacre, manhunt for terrorists, Marawi City, Marawi City attacks, Marawi conflict, Marawi crisis, Marawi siege, Martial law, Maute group, Mindanao martial law, National Democratic Front of the Philippines, National security, New People's Army, Philippine president, public order, Public safety, pursuit operations, rebellion, Rodrigo Duterte, Security, Terrorism, War
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2019 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.