Russia preparing for next stage of offensive, Ukraine says | Inquirer News

Russia preparing for next stage of offensive, Ukraine says

/ 12:34 PM July 17, 2022
Russia preparing for next stage of offensive, Ukraine says

Emergency crew work amidst collapsed building site in Chuhuiv Town, Kharkiv, Ukraine, in this handout image obtained by REUTERS on July 16, 2022. State Emergency Service of Ukraine/Handout via REUTERS

KYIV — Russia is preparing for the next stage of its offensive in Ukraine, a Ukrainian military official said, after Moscow said its forces would step up military operations in “all operational areas”.

Russian rockets and missiles have pounded cities in strikes that Kyiv says have killed dozens in recent days.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It is not only missile strikes from the air and sea,” Vadym Skibitskyi, a spokesman for Ukrainian military intelligence, said on Saturday. “We can see shelling along the entire line of contact, along the entire front line. There is an active use of tactical aviation and attack helicopters.

“There is indeed a certain activation of the enemy along the entire front line… Clearly preparations are now underway for the next stage of the offensive.”

FEATURED STORIES

The Ukrainian military said Russia appeared to be regrouping units for an offensive towards Sloviansk, a symbolically important city held by Ukraine in the eastern region of Donetsk.

Russia preparing for next stage of offensive, Ukraine says

Smoke billows above a building, as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine continues, in Odesa, Ukraine, in this handout image released on July 16, 2022. State Emergency Services of Ukraine/Handout via REUTERS

Ukraine says at least 40 people have been killed in Russian shelling of urban areas in the last three days, as the war launched by Russian President Vladimir Putin on Feb. 24 intensifies.

Rockets hit the northeastern town of Chuhuiv in Kharkiv region on Friday night, killing three people including a 70-year-old woman and wounding three others, said regional Governor Oleh Synehubov.

“Three people lost their lives, why? What for? Because Putin went mad?” said Raisa Shapoval, 83, a distraught resident sitting in the ruins of her home.

To the south, more than 50 Russian Grad rockets pounded the city of Nikopol on the Dnipro River, killing two people who were found in the rubble, said Governor Valentyn Reznichenko.

Moscow, which calls the invasion a “special military operation” to demilitarise and “denazify” its neighbour, says it uses high-precision weapons to degrade Ukraine’s military infrastructure and protect its own security. It has repeatedly denied targeting civilians.

Russia preparing for next stage of offensive, Ukraine says

A view shows part of a residential building collapsing, after it was hit by a military strike, amid Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, in Chuhuiv, Kharkiv region, Ukraine in this screen grab taken from a handout video released July 16, 2022. State Emergency Service of Ukraine/Handout via REUTERS

Kyiv and the West say the conflict is an unprovoked attempt to reconquer a country that broke free of Moscow’s rule with the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991.

ADVERTISEMENT

Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu ordered military units to intensify operations to prevent Ukrainian strikes on eastern Ukraine and other areas held by Russia, where he said Kyiv could hit civilian infrastructure or residents, according to a statement from the ministry.

His remarks appeared to be a direct response to what Kyiv says is a string of successful strikes carried out on 30 Russian logistics and ammunitions hubs, using several multiple launch rocket systems recently supplied by the West.

The strikes are causing havoc with Russian supply lines and have significantly reduced Russia’s offensive capability, Ukraine’s defence ministry spokesperson said on Friday.

RELATED STORIES

G20 finance chiefs resolved on food security; Ukraine war prevents formal communique

Kyiv sounds alarm over war-ravaged nature, EU vows aid

Ukraine hit by widespread shelling, apartment toll rises to 18

Poland asks Ukraine to confront dark past despite common front against Moscow

Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: Conflict, Russia-Ukraine war
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter



© Copyright 1997-2022 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.