Marcos' victory fills supporters with high hopes | Inquirer News
Close  

Marcos’ victory fills supporters with high hopes

/ 07:21 PM June 30, 2022
Madonna Merveille, 65, and Precy Vizcarra, 68, along with their companions, wait in line outside the Club Intramuros Golf Course to witness Marcos Jr.’s inauguration.

From left: Madonna Merveille and Precy Vizcarra, along with their companions, wait in line outside the Club Intramuros Golf Course to witness Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr.’s inauguration.

MANILA, Philippines — From lowering market prices to continuing the Duterte legacy, supporters of the newly sworn-in chief of state Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. are confident that he will live up to his promises during his term.  

To culminate the celebration following the victory of their presidential bet, Marcos’ supporters flocked to the Club Intramuros Golf Course in Manila to witness his inauguration on Thursday. 

ADVERTISEMENT

They didn’t come empty-handed as they brought their high expectations for the President with them.  

INQUIRER.net spoke with a few of Marcos’ supporters to peek into their wishlist for the administration. 

FEATURED STORIES

A promise to lower prices

Madonna Merveille, 65, and Precy Vizcarra, 68, trust Marcos can trim down the cost of goods just as he vowed. 

“Siya lang ang pinakamatalinong presidente. Lahat ng bilihin, ibababa niya — kuryente, tubig, bigas,” they said. 

(He is the most brilliant president. He will reduce the prices of all goods — electricity, water, and rice.) 

Marcos has so far committed to cutting down the price of rice and seeking a study that would recommend a solution to the high power rates in the country. 

READ: Bongbong Marcos vows to bring down price of rice

READ: Marcos wants more power plants to bring down electricity rates

ADVERTISEMENT

Better than before

Noting that she has been a Marcos loyalist since birth, Virginia Carreon, 64, expressed confidence that the president will outperform his predecessors. 

“Marami kaming inaasahang maganda na hindi naibigay ng mga nakaraang presidente. Kaya siguradong sigurado na uunlad iyong bansa natin at saka lahat ng pangako niya matutupad. Ganyan ang tatak Marcos kaya masaya kami na nanalo siya,” she stressed. 

(We’re expecting a lot of good things from him, especially those that previous presidents did not accomplish. We’re certain that the country will prosper and all of his promises will be fulfilled because that’s the Marcos trademark. And that’s why we’re happy that he won.) 

Duterte legacy continued

Another self-confessed loyalist Edgar Flaminian, 50, said he hopes Marcos would adopt the legacy of former President Rodrigo Duterte. 

“Sana magawa niya ‘yong mga sinabi niya. Dapat niyang ipagpatuloy ‘yong mga nasimulan ni Pangulong Duterte,” he noted. 

(I hope he follows through with what he earlier said. He should continue what President Duterte has started.)

Chairman of the DDS-Metro Manila BBM-Sara volunteer support group Suhaili Abangon, 59, echoed Flaminian’s call to uphold what Duterte has established during his term. 

He said: “Naniniwala po ako sa kaniya na kung ano man ang nakita natin na nagawa ng ating mahal na Pangulong [Duterte], iyon din ang susundan ni Bongbong Marcos.” 

(I believe in him. Bongbong Marcos will pursue what we witnessed during the term of our beloved President Duterte.) 

Marcos-Duterte volunteer group leader Suhaili Abangon carries a congratulatory tarpaulin for Marcos Jr. with his fellow supporters

Marcos-Duterte volunteer group leader Suhaili Abangon carries a congratulatory tarpaulin for Marcos Jr. with his fellow supporters.

The Duterte administration left a controversial legacy characterized by its brutal campaign against illegal drugs

The former president is facing a complaint before the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity in connection with the killings during his bloody drug war. 

READ: Malacañang ‘exasperated’ with ICC request to resume probe into PH drug war

Marcos earlier unveiled his plan to continue the campaign on his own terms. He even attempted to get Duterte as his drug czar, which the latter turned down. 

READ: Palace: Duterte turns down drug czar post under Bongbong Marcos admin

Clad in his Bongbong Marcos shirt, Mike dela Cruz shows off his other Marcos-related memorabilia

Clad in his Bongbong Marcos shirt, Mike dela Cruz shows off his other Marcos-related memorabilia.

Mirroring Marcos Sr. and Duterte

Mike dela Cruz, 48, expressed his hopes for Marcos’ administration to reflect both Duterte and Ferdinand Marcos Sr.’s legacies. 

“Ang inaasahan ko po kay Bongbong Marcos ay ipagpatuloy niya ‘yong nagawa ng tatay niya, si President Marcos Sr., at si President Duterte. Iyong mga sinasabi niyang plataporma noong tumatakbo pa lang siya, ipagpatuloy niya,” Cruz stressed. 

(I expect Bongbong Marcos to continue what his father, President Marcos Sr., and President Duterte started. The platforms he earlier shared when he was campaigning should be fulfilled.) 

Marcos Sr., the President’s late father and namesake, was a known strongman when he imposed martial law over the country decades ago. 

READ: Marcos: Rise and fall of a dictator

Cruz, however, came in the defense of Marcos: “Ang kasalanan ng ama ay hindi kasalanan ng anak. Wala pong kasalanan ‘yong anak.” 

(The faults of his father are not his. It’s not the son’s sins.) 

JMS/abc

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.
Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr., Marcos supporters, President Rodrigo Duterete
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and
acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.



© Copyright 1997-2022 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.