Most barangay heads in NCR face raps for failing to enforce social distancing | Inquirer News
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Most barangay heads in NCR face raps for failing to enforce social distancing

By: - Reporter / @ConsINQ
/ 12:03 PM April 23, 2020

MANILA, Philippines — About 70-percent of barangay chairmen in Metro Manila, who have show-cause orders from the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) failed to implement social distancing in their respective areas, Interior Secretary Eduardo Año said Thursday.

“Well, ang pinakamarami, comprising of about 70 percent, not imposing social distancing and allowing mass gathering,” Año told dzMM when asked about the 29 local officials who received SCOs from DILG for violating lockdown rules.

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(Well, mostly, comprised of about 70 percent, did not impose social distancing and allow mass gathering.)

“‘Yung iba diyan pinapa-pila ng barangay captain tapos dikit-dikit. Dapat kasi maliwanag na dapat relief goods, dini-distribute sa bahay, ‘wag lang kinoconverge sa isang lugar,” he added.

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(Some of the residents were being asked by barangay captain to form lines where residents are close together. It should be clear that relief goods must be distributed to their house but they must not converge at an area.)

Año reiterated that 29 barangay captains may face penalty of suspension up to dismissal if it was proven that local officials violated the quarantine protocols.

The erring barangay captains were given 48 hours to respond to the SCOs or they will face sanctions.

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TAGS: coronavirus Philippines, Department of the Interior and Local Government, Eduardo Año, enhanced community quarantine, Jonathan Malaya, Nation
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