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Cordillera artists launch comic book featuring Igorot folklore

The staff of Gripo, a Baguio-based comics publisher/ INQUIRER PHOTO/ Kristine Valerie Damian

BAGUIO CITY — “Pinading,” “Gatui” and “Lampong” are mythological creatures in Igorot culture which now star in their own comic book, Gayang (spear), courtesy of a local art group that launched their publication here on Saturday (June 22).

Senior high school students unearthed and studied accounts about the creatures that go bump in the night out in the upland Cordillera provinces, which helped guide the story of Gayang, said Gerald Asbucan, who formed the Gripo comics brand.

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Some of the artwork used in the comic book were also made by the students.

One of their favorite creatures was Gatui of Ifugao, which feasts on the souls of people, particularly the unborn child, making them a close variation of the more mainstream folk creature, the “manananggal.”

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Pinading is another Tuwali Ifugao creature, a spirit that has yellow hair, which makes it similar to the European fairy.

A section of comic books produced by Gripo, a Baguio-based comics publisher/ INQUIRER PHOTO/ Kristine Valerie Damian

Lampong is a dwarf-like protector of nature.

Asbucan said the group wants to share the culture and untold legends of the Igorots.

“We barely scratched the surface of Igorot folklore so we will put more effort into research to be able to feature more highland myths,” he said.

The next Gayang issue will be out in six months. (Editor: Leti Z. Boniol)

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TAGS: artists, comic book, Cordillera, folklore, Gatul, Igorot, Lampong, Local news, Pinading
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