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CHRISTMAS SPECIAL SESSION

Inquirer Read-Along: Street kids learn story about second chances

/ 07:21 AM December 03, 2018
GUEST READER Television actress Bea Binene, one of the guest storytellers in the Inquirer Read- Along session on Saturday, reads to street children “Nang Magkakulay ang Nayon” (When the Village Became Colorful), a story of how people worked together to transform their dull and dusty village into a colorful and vibrant place. —JAM STA. ROSA

GUEST READER Television actress Bea Binene, one of the guest storytellers in the Inquirer Read- Along session on Saturday, reads to street children “Nang Magkakulay ang Nayon” (When the Village Became Colorful), a story of how people worked together to transform their dull and dusty village into a colorful and vibrant place. —JAM STA. ROSA

Everyone deserves a second chance, especially those who have sinned against us.

This was the lesson from the story of veteran theater actress and singer Pinky Marquez to some 100 street children who joined the Christmas special session of Inquirer Read-Along at the Inquirer office in Makati City on Saturday.

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Marquez read “Ang Hardinerong Tipaklong” (The Gardener Grasshopper) by Rose Torres-Yu.

The story is about a crooked grasshopper that used to damage a vegetable and flower garden. After being caught by the gardener, the insect was given a chance to change its ways to become the guardian of the garden.

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A chance at renewal

“If someone has sinned against us, give a second chance because we might not know where that person is coming from,” Marquez said.

“We may sanction them for their mistakes out of love, but it is through our forgiveness that gives them hope to become renewed persons,” she added.

Other guest readers were GMA actress Bea Binene, healthy cooking advocate Juana Yupangco, and professional storyteller Rich Rodriguez of Ang Pinoy Storytellers.

Yupangco read Mabi David’s “Paano Kumain ng Kulay” (How to Eat Color), which encourages healthy diet through consuming organic and colorful fruits and vegetables. She is the founder of “Mesa Ni Misis,” (Mother’s Table) a nonprofit movement that promotes healthy cooking using sustainable and locally available food sources.

David, who was also present during the session, encouraged the children to “eat the rainbow,” as each food color contains vitamins and minerals essential for nourishment.

Virginia Benosa-Llorin, campaigner for food and ecological agriculture of Greenpeace Philippines, urged the youngsters to eat more vegetables and reduce meat consumption to save the environment.

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“We must change our mindset to eat more plant-based food. We have to consider its positive impact on the environment aside from the health aspect that we already know,” Llorin said.

The advocacy is not yet well known among Filipinos, Llorin said.

A Social Weather Stations survey commissioned by Greenpeace Philippines in June 2017 found that only three of 10 Filipinos believed that eating meat was damaging the environment.

The nationwide poll also found that the majority of respondents consumed meat several times a week. Some who eat meat claimed that it was good for health and it boosted appetite.

Binene read “Nang Magkakulay ang Nayon” (When the Village Became Colorful) by Susan dela Rosa Aragon. It tells how the townsfolk worked together to transform their dull and dusty village into a colorful and vibrant place.

A returning storyteller, Binene encouraged the children to be hardworking and concerned about others.

Simple acts

“Simple act matters because it could lead to a life-changing result,” she said.

Rodriguez read Rene Villanueva’s “Si Emang Engkantada at ang Tatlong Haragan” (Emma the Fairy and the Three Brats), a story about three children who, after being put under a spell by an enchantress for destroying her garden, learn to take care of their surroundings.

After the session, the participants were treated to a plant-based lunch and given storybooks from Greenpeace Philippines, ham from Hands On Manila Foundation, and doughnuts from Pridez Foods Services.

They also received new slippers from LRP Foundation and hygiene kits and groceries from Inquirer employees.

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TAGS: Inquirer Read-Along, second chances, Street children
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