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DOJ offers jobs to 23 new lawyers who passed bar exam

/ 03:47 PM May 04, 2017
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The Department of Justice. (Photo by RYAN LEAGOGO/INQUIRER.net)

The Department of Justice (DOJ) has opened its doors to 23 new lawyers who passed the 2016 Bar Examinations for employment.

“They will get an offer of employment to join us at the DOJ so that they can continue and build on the good work that they have started,” Justice Secretary Vitaliano N. Aguirre II said, referring to the 23 new lawyers on Thursday.

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These 23 lawyers are part of the Department of Justice-Office of the Secretary (DOJ-OSEC) Volunteer Paralegal Immersion Program which provides on the job training on almost all facets of the operations of the Office of the Secretary.

The paralegals work on case studies and prepare and attend events including congressional inquiries.

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Out of a total of 37 Volunteer Paralegals who took the bar exam, 23 successfully hurdled the examinations for a very commendable 62.16% passing percentage. which is higher than the national passing percentage of 59.06%.

Aguirre also added their immersion program is to “demystify the DOJ and, at the same time, give our future lawyers the chance to see the DOJ as a potential employer in the future.”

Last year, Aguirre urged lawyers to join the DOJ.

He said the DOJ is looking to hiring more than 100 prosecutors to catch up with backlog of cases and fill up vacant positions in provinces. Eiriel Rain H. Dollete, INQUIRER.net trainee/JE/rga

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TAGS: Aguirre, Bar Exam, Department of Justice, DoJ, Employment, immersion program, job, Lawyer, paralegal
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