Despite shelling, family life goes on in cellar in eastern Ukraine | Inquirer News

Despite shelling, family life goes on in cellar in eastern Ukraine

/ 11:17 AM August 30, 2022
Despite shelling, family life goes on in cellar in eastern Ukraine

27-year-old Olga, a Ukrainian woman, hugs her daughter as they cry near their house in the village of Pereizne, in direct proximity of the front line in the war-affected area in eastern Ukraine, as Russia’s attack in Ukraine continues, in Donetsk region, Ukraine, August 28, 2022. REUTERS

PEREIZNE, Ukraine — Bogdan and Olga have had no electricity, gas or running water for more than a month in their village near the frontline in eastern Ukraine, but they have no plans to leave.

The couple live in a simple house in the village of Pereizne in the Donetsk region, with their four children, aged between four and 10, and three grandparents.

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The village, which had a population of 500 before Russia invaded Ukraine in late February, bears the scars of war and occasional shellfire can be heard and seen landing in the fields nearby.

Despite shelling, family life goes on in cellar in eastern Ukraine

4-year-old Ukrainian boy Gleb looks out from behind a gate with shrapnel marks on it, in the village of Pereizne, in direct proximity of the front line in the war-affected area in eastern Ukraine, as Russia’s attack in Ukraine continues, in Donetsk region, Ukraine, August 28, 2022. REUTERS

“They shell us constantly, there is no help, no water, no food,” said Bogdan, 31. “For literally a month, they don’t bring anything, not even bread. We live from whatever we’ve got here.”

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The family survive on the food they have grown, baking bread in an oven in the garden and drawing water from a well.

When there is shelling they take shelter in a cellar where they have stockpiled some provisions.

“More or less, we’ve got everything here in the cellar,” said Bogdan. “When they shell us, we eat here.”

Despite shelling, family life goes on in cellar in eastern Ukraine

87-year-old Ukrainian Vera Andreevana crosses the road in front of her house, in the village of Pereizne, in direct proximity of the front line in the war-affected area in eastern Ukraine, as Russia’s attack in Ukraine continues, in Donetsk region, Ukraine, August 28, 2022. REUTERS

Olga, 27, is expecting the couple’s fifth child. She worries about the effect the conflict is having on the children.

“We, as adults, at least know what to do,” she said, gesturing to their young son, Gleb. “What will he do, for example? He is four years old and does not understand yet, thank God, that this is war.”

Still, she says the family are determined to hold on to the home they have worked hard for.

“Our property is not fancy,” she said. “But it is ours.”

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TAGS: Conflict, Family, Russia-Ukraine war
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