46% of adult Filipinos unwilling to get COVID-19 vaccine; only 19% willing | Inquirer News
Close  

46% of adult Filipinos unwilling to get COVID-19 vaccine; only 19% willing

/ 12:58 AM February 25, 2021

MANILA, Philippines —Only 19 percent of adult Filipinos are willing to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and 46 percent are unwilling even if a safe and effective vaccine is available.

This is the finding of a survey done by OCTA Research, a group of top academicians studying the coronavirus pandemic.

ADVERTISEMENT

According to the survey, the intent to get vaccines is lowest among respondents in Balance Luzon, which is at 14 percent, followed by the Visayas at 20 percent, Metro Manila at 25 percent, and Mindanao at 26 percent.

Meanwhile, the number of those who would reject COVID-19 vaccination is highest in Balance Luzon and the Visayas at 47 percent, followed by Mindanao and Metro Manila at 43 percent each.

FEATURED STORIES

Roughly a third, or 35 percent, were undecided if they would get vaccinated. Most of these were in Balance Luzon at 39 percent, followed by Metro Manila at 31 percent, the Visayas at 33 percent, and Mindanao at 32 percent.

The top reason for not getting the vaccine, given by 73 percent of respondents, was a concern for the safety of the vaccines, followed by doubt about their efficacy.

Concern for vaccine safety was higher in Mindanao at 78 percent and in Balance Luzon at 76 percent, compared to Metro Manila at 69 percent and in the Visayas at 64 percent.

One alarming figure that the study found out is that 9 percent do not want to get the vaccine because they believe it is not needed to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

The two other reasons for not wanting to get vaccinated were “the vaccine is not free,” given by 6 percent of respondents, and “the vaccine is expensive,” given by 6 percent.

The OCTA Research survey shows little variance between various socioeconomic classes’ in their sentiments towards the COVID-19 vaccine. Those willing to get vaccinated are 23 percent in Classes A, B, and C; 18 percent in Class D; and 23 percent in Class E.

Those unwilling to get vaccinated are 45 percent in Classes A, B, and C; 46 percent in Class D; 44 percent in Class E.

ADVERTISEMENT

This is not the first survey on COVID-19 vaccination conducted by OCTA Research. Last January, the group released another study saying that only 25 percent of Metro Manila residents would want to get vaccinated.

Aside from issues with COVID-19 vaccine procurement, the government is always questioned about its efforts to disseminate proper information about vaccines while assuring the public about its safety and efficacy.

In a radio interview last January, Vice President Leni Robredo said that the government must craft an efficient communication plan that would clear up concerns with the COVID-19 vaccines.

While Malacañang rebuked Robredo for her suggestions — saying that these were already being carried out — the Vice President’s camp questioned why surveys done by different polling firms indicated low appreciation for COVID-19 vaccines.

RELATED STORIES

OVP asks admin: If vaccine communication plan is in place, why do Pinoys hesitate?

Survey: Nearly 50% of Pinoys shun vaccine

[atm]

For more news about the novel coronavirus click here.
What you need to know about Coronavirus.
For more information on COVID-19, call the DOH Hotline: (02) 86517800 local 1149/1150.

The Inquirer Foundation supports our healthcare frontliners and is still accepting cash donations to be deposited at Banco de Oro (BDO) current account #007960018860 or donate through PayMaya using this link .

Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: coronavirus pandemic, coronavirus Philippines, COVID-19 Vaccines, OCTA Research, willingness to get COVID-19 vaccines
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2021 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.