Army says 1 NPA guerrilla killed in Negros Occidental town clash | Inquirer News
Close  

Army says 1 NPA guerrilla killed in Negros Occidental town clash

/ 05:51 PM November 06, 2020

BACOLOD CITY—The military on Thursday (Nov. 6) said a New People’s Army (NPA) guerrilla was killed in a clash with government soldiers at a village in Moises Padilla town, Negros Occidental.

Capt. Kelvin Bayaban, civil military operations officer of the Army’s 3rd Infantrby Division, identified the slain guerrilla as Rio Jacaba. Bayaban said Jacaba suffered multiple gunshot wounds.

ADVERTISEMENT

Bayaban said the clash erupted after soldiers checked a report by residents of the village of Macagahay about the presence of suspicious-looking men in the area.

He said when the soldiers arrived at the village, the guerrillas immediately opened fire.

FEATURED STORIES

Found in the clash site were firearms believed being used by the guerrillas and communist documents which guerrillas were believed to be using for recruitment in the area, according to Bayaban.

Col. Inocencio Pasaporte, 303rd Brigade commander, thanked of Macagahay village for reporting the presence of guerrillas in their community.

He called on the remaining guerrillas in central Negros to abandon their armed struggle and return to the folds of the law.

Pasaporte cited the Moises Padilla Task Force to End Local Communist Armed Conflict as a tool to “unify and harmonize” counterinsurgency efforts of the government in the province.

TSB
Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: Army, clash, guerrillas, Insurgency, Negros Occidental, Regions
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.

News that matters

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and
acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.



© Copyright 1997-2022 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.