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urges Pinoys to capture Rizal’s vision of reforms

Robredo: progress cant be attained thru ‘shortcuts, brutal solutions’

/ 09:37 AM December 30, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – Vice President Leni Robredo has urged Filipinos to emulate Dr. Jose Rizal’s vision where the country’s problems are solved without resorting to brutal, violent, and illegal means.

Robredo said on Monday, Rizal Day, that people should use the occasion to internalize and remember how the revered hero would have pushed for reforms that would promote equality among people.

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“Sa panahong ito kung kailan sinusubok tayo bilang isang sambayanan ng napakaraming hamon, alalahanin at isabuhay natin ang sigasig ni Rizal sa pagsulong ng mga reporma sa ating bansa at ng pagkakapantay-pantay ng bawat Pilipino,” the vice president said in a statement.

“Ang mabisang pagtugon sa mga suliranin ng ating bansa ay maisasakatuparan lamang sa paggawa ng tama, sa wastong pamamaraan. Hindi natin makakamit ang tunay na pag-unlad sa pamamagitan ng mga madalian at brutal na solusyon, lalo na iyong tahasang tumataliwas sa ating mga batas,” she added.

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(In times like these where we as a country are faced with so many challenges, let us remember and exemplify Rizal’s yearning to push reforms and equality among all Filipinos.)

(The most effective answer to the country’s problems can be attained only through doing what is right, and in the right manner.  We cannot attain true progress by resorting to shortcuts and brutal solutions, especially those who blatantly go against the law.)

Rizal, the man behind the immortal novels Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) and El Filibusterismo (The Filibuster), was executed by the ruling Spanish colonial government on the same date in 1896. The two books contained the ills of the society, mainly with the Catholic friars who abused and plundered the country, for which he was sentenced to death on allegations of inspiring the revolutionary movement.

But Rizal was also known for opting to use peaceful means as a way of attaining freedom for Filipinos.

The year 2019 marks the 123rd anniversary of Rizal’s execution in Bagumbayan or modern-day Luneta Park on December 30.

Robredo mentioned a letter written by Rizal to his friend, Professor Ferdinand Blumentritt, which provides a glimpse of the hero’s aspirations and reservations about attaining freedom through violent means.

“‘We want the happiness of the Philippines, but we want to obtain it through noble and just means, for right is on our side and therefore we ought not to do anything wrong’,” Robredo said, quoting Rizal’s letter.  “‘If I have to act villainously in order to make my country happy, I would refuse to do it because I am sure that what is built on sand sooner or later would tumble down’.”

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Robredo asked the public to remain firm in their principles, in order for the country to attain progress for everybody.

“Manatili sana tayong matatag sa ating mga prinsipyo at paninindigan, nang sa gayon ay makamit natin ang pagbabago na walang naiiwan at nagbibigay ng katarungan para sa lahat. Sa paggawa ng tama at mabuti, maiaangat natin ang buhay ng bawat Pilipino at makapaghahatid ng kasaganahan sa pinakamamahal nating Pilipinas,” she explained.

(Let us remain firm in our principles and convictions so that we move towards progress and change without leaving anyone behind and with justice for all.  In doing what is right and proper, we can uplift the lives of every Filipino, which would bring a prosperous age for the country.)

Robredo is a staunch critic of President Duterte’s bloody campaign against illegal drugs.

She was appointed as co-chair of the Inter-Agency Committee on Anti-Illegal Drugs (ICAD) after she angered the president with her criticism of his brutal war on drugs, saying in an Oct. 23 interview with Reuters that too many people had been killed but the drug problem had remained prevalent.

Her stint proved short, however, as she was fired on November 24, or less than 20 days later when the President accused her of making “an asshole of herself” after she met with the officials of Embassy of the United States in Manila to discuss Duterte’s drug war.

Robredo, however, vowed to continue the fight and announced that she would disclose something she discovered in the course of waging her version of the war on drugs after the holidays.

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TAGS: Dr. Jose Rizal, Drug war, Leni Robredo, Office of the Vice President, OVP, Philippine news updates, Rizal Day, Rodrigo Duterte
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