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Eastern Samar town sizzles with 50.8 degrees Celsius heat index

/ 09:00 PM May 02, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – The heat index in Guiuan, Eastern Samar soared to 50.8 degrees Celcius on Thursday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) said.

Pagasa’s heat index board showed that the peak heat index in Eastern Samar, which reached dangerous levels, was recorded at around 11 a.m.

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The heat index in the municipality of Guiuan is only slightly lower than the recorded highest heat index so far this year at 51.7 degrees Celsius in Dagupan City, Pangasinan last April 9.

Aside from Guiuan, 17 other areas in the country also reported dangerous heat index levels.

Pagasa said a heat index of 41 degrees or higher is already considered dangerous as they may pose health risks.

Other areas that reported dangerous heat index on Thursday were:

  • Ambulong, Batangas – 46.2 degrees
  • Dagupan City, Pangasinan – 45.3 degrees
  • Roxas City, Capiz – 45.1 degrees
  • Sangley Point, Cavite – 44.3 degrees
  • Cuyo, Palawan – 43.1 degrees
  • El Salvador City, Misamis Oriental – 42.8 degrees
  • San Jose City, Occidental Mindoro – 42.6 degrees
  • Pasay City, Metro Manila – 42.4 degrees
  • Dipolog, Zamboanga del Norte – 42.3 degrees
  • Cotabato City  – 42 degrees
  • Subic Bay, Olongapo City – 42 degrees
  • Iba, Zambales – 42 degrees
  • Tuguegarao City, Cagayan – 41.9 degrees
  • Alabat, Quezon – 41.7 degrees
  • Casiguran, Aurora – 41.2 degrees
  • Masbate City, Masbate – 41.2 degrees
  • Daet, Camarines Norte – 41 degrees

/gsg

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TAGS: 50.2 degrees Celsius, Eastern Samar, heat index, Pagas
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