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DENR vows ‘speedy closure’ of South Korea’s waste shipment case

/ 05:52 PM November 13, 2018

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has vowed a “speedy closure” of South Korea’s waste shipment case.

“Hindi natin hahayaang humaba ito (We are not going to let this issue drag on),” DENR Undersecretary for Solid Waste Management and Local Government Units Concerns Benny Antiporda said in a statement.

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He said the cargo was declared as recyclable “plastic synthetic flakes,” but initial findings showed that the 5,100-ton  shipment contained used dextrose tubes, used diapers, batteries, bulbs and electronic equipment.

He described the incident as “alarming” because the shipment is “obviously hazardous” and “could pollute the water table.”

The DENR official gave assurances that the department, through its Environmental Management Bureau (EMB), is now conducting a waste analysis and characterization study (WACS) on the shipment.

Based on the results of the WACS, “appropriate actions” will immediately be taken. This includes the return of the shipment back to South Korea and the filing of cases to those who are involved.

The results will be out “within this week,” according to Antiporda.

He noted that the shipment, consigned to South Korean company Verde Soko II Industrial Corporation (Verde Soko), was unloaded at the sub-port of the Mindanao Container Terminal in Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental on July 21, 2018.

Records from the EMB showed that the shipment was not covered by any importation clearance issued by the DENR. /ee

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TAGS: Benny Antiporda, DENR, Philippines, South korea, waste shipment
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