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People behind viral banners may face city ordinance violations

/ 05:15 PM July 13, 2018

“Welcome to the Philippines, Province of China” banners

If identified, the people behind the unauthorized display of banners stating that the Philippines is a province of China may face charges for violating city ordinances, a Philippine National Police (PNP) official said Friday.

“There are city ordinances [in place]… you cannot just post your sentiments anywhere. Sometimes, especially if it will catch the attention of commuters,” PNP spokesperson Sr. Supt. Benigno Durana Jr. said in a press briefing at Camp Crame.

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“May mga batas, local ordinances na ipinapatupad ng ating local government units (LGUs) para to maintain order in our communities,” he added.

(There are laws, local ordinances that the LGU implements to maintain order in our communities.)

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“Welcome to the Philippines, Province of China” banners were seen hanging in different parts of Metro Manila on Thursday, the same day that marked the second anniversary of The Hague ruling, favoring the Philippines’ claim to parts of the South China Sea.

READ: ‘Welcome to the Philippines, Province of China’ banners hung on footbridges

Photos of the banners quickly went viral online, drawing speculations that the act was satirical.

Durana on Thursday said the PNP Intelligence Group has already launched an investigation on people suspected to behind the hanging of the banners.Kristine Macasiray/Inquirer.net intern /muf

READ: PNP looking for people behind posting of ‘PH, Province of China’ banners

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TAGS: banners, China, Footbridges, Metro Manila
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