Quantcast
Latest Stories
Home » Mars You are browsing entries tagged with “Mars”

Tycoon wants to send married couple on Mars flyby

By
A drawing provided by Inspiration Mars shows an artist’s conception of a spacecraft envisioned by the private group, which wants to send a married couple on a mission to fly by the red planet and zip back home, beginning in 2018. The nonprofit “Inspiration Mars” will get initial money from multimillionaire Dennis Tito, the first space tourist. Outsiders put the price tag at more than $1 billion. The mission, announced Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013, would last more than 16 months. (AP Photo/Inspiration Mars)

It is a road trip that could test the best of marriages: Mars.

Posted: February 28th, 2013 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

‘Black Beauty’ could yield Martian secrets

This photograph obtained January 3, 2013 courtesy of NASA shows a fist-sized meteorite nicknamed "Black Beauty", which could unlock vital clues to the evolution of Mars from the warm and wet place it once was to its current cold and dry state, NASA said January 3, 2013.   Discovered in Morocco's Sahara Desert in 2011, the 11-ounce (320-gram) space rock contains 10 times more water than other Martian meteorites and could be the first ever to have originated on the planet's surface or crust.     AFP PHOTO / NASA

WASHINGTON — A fist-sized meteorite nicknamed “Black Beauty” could unlock vital clues to the evolution of Mars from the warm and wet place it once was to its current cold and dry state, NASA said Thursday.
Discovered in Morocco’s Sahara Desert in 2011, the 11-ounce (320-gram) space rock contains 10 times more water than other Martian meteorites and could be the first ever to have originated on the planet’s surface or crust.
After more than a year of intensive study, a team of US scientists determined the meteorite formed 2.1 billion years ago during the beginning of the most recent geologic period on Mars, known as the Amazonian, NASA said.
The abundance of water molecules in the meteorite — about 6,000 parts per million, 10 times more than other known rocks — suggests water activity persisted on the Martian surface when it was formed.
It is generally accepted that Mars had abundant water early in its existence — scientists ponder if life might once have existed there — but the nature of its evolution to a cold and dry place remains a mystery.
“Many scientists think that Mars was warm and wet in its early history, but the planet’s climate changed over time,” lead scientist Carl Agee, whose study was published in “Science Express,” told Space.com.
Known technically as NWA (Northwest Africa) 7034, “Black Beauty” is made of cemented fragments of basalt, a rock that forms from rapidly cooled lava.
“Perhaps most exciting is that the high water content could mean there was an interaction of the rocks with surface water either from volcanic magma, or from fluids from impacting comets during that time,” co-author Andrew Steele said.
“It is the richest Martian meteorite geochemically and further analyses are bound to unleash more surprises.”
Unlike most Martian meteorites, it is thought to be from the planet’s surface, not deeper inside, as its chemistry matched surface rocks NASA has studied remotely via Mars rovers and orbiting satellites.
“Researchers theorize the large amount of water contained in NWA 7034 may have originated from interaction of the rocks with water present in Mars’ crust,” NASA said.
“The meteorite also has a different mixture of oxygen isotopes than has been found in other Martian meteorites, which could have resulted from interaction with the Martian atmosphere.”
More than 100 Martian meteorites have been discovered on Earth to date but most come from three meteorites: Shergotty, Nakhla, and Chassigny.
NWA 7034 has unique characteristics and it took scientists several months to ascertain that it did indeed come from Mars and not another planet, or from an asteroid belt.
“The age of NWA 7034 is important because it is significantly older than most other Martian meteorites,” said Mitch Schulte, program scientist for the Mars Exploration Program at NASA headquarters in Washington.
“We now have insight into a piece of Mars’ history at a critical time in its evolution.”
Agee echoed those comments.
“This Martian meteorite has everything in its composition that you’d want in order to further our understanding of the Red Planet,” he said, noting that it “tells us what volcanism was like on Mars two billion years ago”.
“It also gives us a glimpse of ancient surface and environmental conditions on Mars that no other meteorite has ever offered,” Agee added.
It was not until the 1980s that scientists were able to determine the origin of meteorites by analyzing small pockets of atmospheric gas trapped inside.
Gases are released by heating the rock in a laboratory and then analyzed and compared, in this case, to the information gathered by probes orbiting Mars or on its surface.
The latest probe, the Curiosity rover — the most sophisticated ever sent to another planet — has since August been searching for signs the planet was ever suitable for microbial life.
“The contents of this meteorite may challenge many long held notions about Martian geology,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.
“These findings also present an important reference frame for the Curiosity rover as it searches for reduced organics in the minerals exposed in the bedrock of Gale Crater.”

Posted: January 4th, 2013 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

Mars rover detects hint of possible life in soil analysis

This picture provided by NASA on December 3, 2012 shows a view of the third (L) and fourth (R) trenches made by the 1.6-inch-wide (4cm) scoop on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity in October 2012. The image was acquired by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on October 31, 2012 and shows some of the details regarding the properties of the "Rocknest" wind drift sand. The upper surface of the drift is covered by coarse sand grains approximately 0.02 to 0.06 inches (0.5 to 1.5 millimeters) in size. These coarse grains are mantled with fine dust, giving the drift surface a light brownish red color. The coarse sand is somewhat cemented to form a thin crust about 0.2 inches (0.5 centimeters) thick. Evidence for the crusting is seen by the presence of angular clods in and around the troughs and in the sharp, jagged indentations and overhangs on one wall of each trench (the walls closest to the top of this figure). Beneath the crust surface, as revealed in the scoop troughs and the piles of sediment on the right side of each, is finer sand, which is darker brown as compared with the dust on the surface. The left end of each trough wall shows alternating light and dark bands, indicating that the sand inside the drift is not completely uniform. This banding might result from different amounts of infiltrated dust, chemical alteration or deposition of sands of slightly different color.     AFP PHOTO/NASA/HO

The Mars rover Curiosity has offered a tantalizing taste of evidence that there was once life on the Red Planet, but scientists said Monday it is too soon to make much of the first soil analyses.

Posted: December 4th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

Mars rover to launch first rock study

Engineers work on a model of the Mars rover Curiosity at the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, Thursday, Aug. 2, 2012. After traveling 8 1/2 months and 352 million miles, Curiosity will attempt a landing on Mars the night of Aug. 5, 2012. AP PHOTO/DAMIAN DOVARGANES

NASA’s Curiosity Rover will study its first martial rock Friday, more than a month after landing on the Red Planet, mission officials said.

Posted: September 20th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,Photos & Videos,World | Read More »

Obama ribs Nasa: Let me know if you find Martians

guyito

US President Barack Obama on Monday ribbed scientists behind Nasa’s roving robot Curiosity, instructing them to let him know right away if they found life on Mars.

Posted: August 15th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

NASA successfully lands rover on Mars

By
This artist's rendering released by NASA/JPL-Caltech on Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012, shows how NASA's Curiosity rover will communicate with Earth during landing. As the rover descends to the surface of Mars, it will send out two different types of data: basic radio-frequency tones that go directly to Earth (pink dots) and more complex UHF radio data (blue circles) that require relaying by orbiters. NASA's Odyssey orbiter will pick up the UHF signal and relay it immediately back to Earth, while NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will record the UHF data and play it back to Earth at a later time. AP /NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA on Sunday successfully landed its $2.5 billion Mars Science Laboratory and Curiosity rover on the surface of the Red Planet, marking the most ambitious attempt to reach Mars in history.

Posted: August 6th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

NASA counts down to dramatic Mars landing

This  Aug. 2, 2012 file photo shows Nick Lam, data controller, monitoring the Mars rover Curiosity from the Deep Space Network's control room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. NASA's Curiosity rover is zooming toward Mars. With about a day to go until a landing attempt, the space agency says the nuclear-powered rover appears on course. AP/Damian Dovarganes, File

With a mixture of tense nerves and confidence, NASA counted down Sunday to the landing of its largest ever robotic rover on Mars, where it will search for signs that life may once have existed.

Posted: August 6th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

NASA spacecraft barreling toward a Mars landing

PASADENA, California—NASA’s Curiosity rover is zooming toward Mars.   With about a day to go until a landing attempt, the space agency says the nuclear-powered rover appears on course.   Tension will be high Sunday night when Curiosity plummets through the thin Martian atmosphere and attempts to set its six wheels down on the surface. [...]

Posted: August 5th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,Photos & Videos,World | Read More »

NASA’s Mars rover two weeks from landing

nasa-logo1

NASA’s Curiosity rover is on target to arrive on Mars on August 6 for a two-year mission to find out whether microbial life once existed on the Red Planet, the US space agency said Monday.

Posted: July 17th, 2012 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

NASA launches super-size rover to Mars

By

A super-size rover zoomed toward Mars on an 8½-month, 354 million-mile (570 million-kilometer) journey Saturday, the biggest, best equipped robot ever sent to explore another planet.

Posted: November 27th, 2011 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

NASA in high gear for Mars rover launch

MARS ROVER LAUNCH. NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory on Nov. 25, 2011 is contained in a fairing that sits atop an Atlas 5 rocket on launch pad 41 at Cape Canaveral, Florida, as final preparations are made for its November 26 launch. The Mars Science Lab in expected to land on Mars early August 2012.  AFP.

The US space agency plans to launch on Saturday the most powerful and advanced robotic rover ever built to explore Mars and hunt for signs that life may once have existed on the red planet.

Posted: November 26th, 2011 in Featured Gallery,Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

Russia hunts for missing Mars probe

Russia made desperate efforts on Thursday to re-establish contact with a pioneering Mars probe that now hangs in a low Earth orbit and could potentially crash back down in matter of days.

Posted: November 10th, 2011 in Latest News Stories,World | Read More »

Earthlings may see Neptune for 1st time since discovery

By

Neptune will appear in the earth’s sky before dawn tomorrow (Tuesday) as the planet completes its 164.7-year orbit around the sun for the first time since it was discovered in 1846, the weather bureau has said.

Posted: July 11th, 2011 in Latest News Stories,Nation | Read More »

Advertisement
  1. Kim Henares needs a reprimand, says Cayetano
  2. ‘No real progress in PH if dynasties not dismantled’
  3. More legal woes for Cedric Lee
  4. Massive infra spending set
  5. OFW brings MERS virus to Philippines
  6. DOJ to NBI: Arrest Cedric Lee, 4 others
  7. Cardinal Tagle to faithful: Join politics to clean it
  8. Estrada, Gigi Reyes denied access to evidence from other respondents
  9. Lacson’s wife loses diamond earring to thieves but recovers jewelry quickly with police arrest
  10. DOJ orders arrest of Cedric Lee
  1. Kim Henares needs a reprimand, says Cayetano
  2. Suspect in Vhong Navarro mauling tries to leave PH
  3. Fr. Suarez says last Mass on Easter before returning donated land to San Miguel
  4. MH370 co-pilot made mid-flight phone call – report
  5. More legal woes for Cedric Lee
  6. I’ll follow my conscience on Estrada, says JV Ejercito
  7. ‘Wife of Jesus’ theory papyrus not fake – Harvard study
  8. Gay college instructor arrested for oral sex with student
  9. ‘No real progress in PH if dynasties not dismantled’
  10. Palace: We can’t blame increase in population on Vitangcol
  1. KL confirms Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 ended in Indian Ocean
  2. MRT passengers pass the hat for 6-year-old Ashley
  3. Pork payoffs to newscasters Erwin Tulfo, Del Prado, others bared
  4. Rookie, lady cops lauded for quick response to MOA heist
  5. Model Helena Belmonte wished ‘to slash her wrist and hope to die’
  6. Malaysia averts another air tragedy; pilot lands troubled plane safely
  7. Revilla says he was joking; Lacson stands by his story
  8. Revilla ‘consulted’ Lacson on how he evaded arrest
  9. Police rule out foul play in Helena Belmonte’s death as boyfriend is ‘traumatized’
  10. Cudia, dismissed for lying, got 99% in conduct

News

  • Anti-gay demo in Ethiopia cancelled
  • Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US
  • Nebraska toddler gets stuck inside claw machine
  • Philippine eagle rescued by Army turned over to DENR
  • Gunmen attack Iraq military base, kill 10 soldiers
  • Sports

  • Vietnam says it will not host Asian Games
  • Nadal passes clay landmark with 300th victory
  • Wawrinka waltzes through with Monte Carlo walkover
  • Power Pinays smash India in Asian Women’s Club volleyball opener
  • PH youth boxers off to stumbling start in AIBA World tilt
  • Lifestyle

  • Ford Mustang turns 50 atop Empire State Building
  • Pro visual artists, lensmen to judge Pagcor’s photo contest
  • ‘Labahita a la bacalao’
  • This is not just a farm
  • Clams and garlic, softshell crab risotto–not your usual seafood fare for Holy Week
  • Entertainment

  • Cannes film festival launches race for 2014 Palme d’Or
  • Jones, Godard, Cronenberg in competition at Cannes
  • Will Arnett files for divorce from Amy Poehler
  • American rapper cuts own penis, jumps off building
  • Jay Z to bring Made in America music fest to LA
  • Business

  • Total says makes ‘very promising’ oil find off Ivory Coast
  • ‘Chinese Twitter’ firm Weibo to go public in US
  • World stocks subdued, Nikkei flat on profit taking
  • Asia stocks fail to match Wall Street gains
  • Fired Yahoo exec gets $58M for 15 months of work
  • Technology

  • Netizens seethe over Aquino’s ‘sacrifice’ message
  • Filipinos #PrayForSouthKorea
  • Taylor Swift tries video blogging, crashes into fan’s bridal shower
  • DOF: Tagaytay, QC best at handling funds
  • Smart phone apps and sites perfect for the Holy Week
  • Opinion

  • Editorial cartoon, April 17, 2014
  • A humbler Church
  • Deepest darkness
  • ‘Agnihotra’ for Earth’s health
  • It’s the Holy Week, time to think of others
  • Global Nation

  • Malaysia quarantines 64 villagers over MERS virus
  • DFA: 2 Filipinos survive Korean ferry disaster
  • PH asks airline passengers to check for MERS
  • Syria most dangerous country for journalists, PH 3rd—watchdog
  • Japan says visa-free entry still a plan
  • Marketplace
    Advertisement