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Enrile is Senate President again

By Christine O. Avendaño
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 21:41:00 07/25/2010

Filed Under: Benigno Aquino III, Politics

MANILA, Philippines -- A survivor of many political wars is keeping his grip on the Senate presidency, after all.

Earlier thought to be on his way out, reelected Senator Juan Ponce Enrile clinched the Senate leadership Sunday night by obtaining the support of 21 senators -- a powerful majority in the 23-member upper chamber of Congress.

Senators said the 86-year-old lawmaker from Cagayan was assured of his continued hold on his position following a series of meetings and sudden developments during the weekend.

The most dramatic was Sunday?s last-minute announcement by Senator Francis Pangilinan, the erstwhile candidate of Malacañang, that he was withdrawing from the Senate presidential race in order to unify the chamber.

?It?s a truly united Senate,? Senator Edgardo Angara told the Philippine Daily Inquirer, saying that all blocs in the chamber have come together to support Enrile as their chief.

It was the second time in the Senate?s recent history that all parties and blocs have backed a common leader, Angara said.

Curiously, both cases involved Enrile and both happened while an Aquino was at the country?s helm -- the first during the presidency of the late Corazon Aquino and now, during the rule of her son, Benigno ?Noynoy? Aquino III.

?In the first Aquino administration, it was Senator Enrile who was the lone minority member in the Senate. Now under the second Aquino administration, he is the head of the unity Senate,? Angara said.

?He [Enrile] has come full circle,? he added.

In a phone interview, Angara credited the sudden turn of events to efforts of the Liberal Party (LP), Nacionalista Party (NP) of Sen. Manuel Villar Jr., and other blocs -- including Angara?s -- to come together and agree on a Senate President by the time the 15th Congress opens this Monday.

Since late last week, Pangilinan had been the frontrunner in the fight for the Senate leadership.

Enrile of the Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino only loomed as an alternative candidate after the NP and LP candidates failed to get the 13 votes needed to win the Senate presidency.

?Since neither side [Villar and Pangilinan] were able to make it, we agreed with Villar and the others that we need to elect one because it would be embarrassing for the Senate if we can?t rule even ourselves,? Angara said.

All different blocs ?contributed? to the unity of the Senate, according to Angara.

He said Enrile was ?the best option? because neither Pangilinan nor Villar was able to secure the 13 votes.

Angara said Senator Jose ?Jinggoy? Estrada would remain as Senate President pro tempore, while Senator Vicente ?Tito? Sotto would be the majority leader.

But with a unified Senate behind Enrile, Angara conceded that the question of who would be the minority leader was up in the air.

?We don?t know yet who would want to stand on the opposite aisle,? he said.

The Senate has 23 members with Aquino?s rise to the presidency. Only 21 of them can vote in Monday?s Senate presidency election.

Senator Antonio Trillanes IV remains detained while Senator Panfilo Lacson has yet to surface after he left the country six months ago while facing charges for the double murder of publicist Salvador ?Bubby? Dacer and Dacer?s driver.

Estrada, like Enrile, committed to support Pangilinan but Estrada made it clear to the LP senator that he would only support him if Enrile did not make a bid for the Senate leadership.

Pangilinan lost support for his bid after party and administration allies late last week confronted him on whether he could secure the necessary numbers and later pushed Enrile to go for the presidency himself.

Enrile had said he would do so if the senators would be able to get him the numbers.

In a statement on Sunday, Pangilinan said he gave up his bid for the top Senate post because he ?realized there are political realities and developments that prevent us from securing the needed 13 votes resulting in a deadlock or stalemate.?

?Much as I would like to go down fighting, I realize that to continue with my bid would keep the Senate fragmented and disunited. The disunity must now end. I believe I can help make it happen by voluntarily stepping aside,? he said.

?It has been a very difficult experience for me and my family, but if I had to do this all over again for the cause of genuine change and reforms for our nation, I would. I would like to thank our people for their prayers and support. We fought a good fight,? Pangilinan said.

Senators were meeting on Sunday to deal with the committee chairmanships. There are 27 chairmanships up for grabs.

Drilon and Estrada said they did not think Enrile?s leadership in the Senate would be a problem for President Aquino.

Drilon said that Enrile from the very start had supported Pangilinan?s bid until the latter was unable to get the needed votes.

Likewise, he said Enrile would support the administration's legislative agenda because not only was the Senate ?an institution which will respond to the needs of the country? but one was inclined to support a ?popular? President such as Mr. Aquino.

Estrada agreed that Enrile would not be a problem for Mr. Aquino since the two men were very much in good terms in the Senate before.

Malacañang said on Sunday it still expected to deal with a Senate ?friendly? to President Aquino despite the withdrawal of Pangilinan from the Senate presidential fight.

?We look forward to working and cooperating with a friendly Senate,? the President?s spokesperson, Edwin Lacierda, said. ?It?s important that we have a friendly Senate [for] our legislative agenda.?

Lacierda said that in hoping for a friendly Senate, Malacañang was not fearing that the senators might scrutinize the Aquino administration for possible corruption.

?The Aquino administration has promised not to engage in any corrupt practices that?s why we are not afraid of that,? he said. ?What we are more concerned of really is the legislative agenda the President has in mind, which will require cooperation from the Senate.?



Copyright 2014 Philippine Daily Inquirer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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