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Robredo did not betray public trust — law dean

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Robredo did not betray public trust — law dean

/ 12:47 PM March 22, 2017

A law dean on Tuesday said Vice President Leni Robredo’s video message for a United Nations event is not proof of her supposed betrayal of public trust.

READ: Robredo brings fight against Duterte to UN

Fr. Ranhillo Aquino, dean of the Sen Beda Graduate School of Law, told Radyo Veritas that there was nothing wrong in Robredo’s decision to express concern over the human rights violations linked to the administration’s war on drugs.

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He said everybody is entitled to an opinion and that Robredo still has her freedom of speech and expression despite being the vice president of the country.

The said video prompted Marcos loyalists’ Oliver Lozano and Melchor Chavez to file an impeachment complaint against Robredo, citing culpable violation of the Constitution, acts of injustice, and betrayal of public trust.

READ: VACC: Leni committed ‘treachery’ vs PH in UN video

In her video message for the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs, Robredo said, “Drug abuse should not be treated as one that can be solved with bullets alone. It must be regarded as it truly is: a complex public health issue, linked intimately with poverty and social inequality.”

Robredo, who is a member of the Liberal Party, has been at odds with President Rodrigo Duterte. Since taking office, Duterte has called for a strong campaign against illegal drugs. Reports said more than 7,000 people have been killed by the police and by vigilante groups in relation to the drug war. KS

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TAGS: Betrayal of public trust, Fr. Ranhillo Aquino, Impeachment, Leni Robredo, United Nations
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