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Timeline: 4 days that ended Morsi’s rule in Egypt



In this July 13, 2012, file photo, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi holds a joint news conference with Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki, unseen, at the Presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt. The armed forces ousted Egypt’s first democratically elected president Wednesday, July 3, 2013, after just a year in power, installing a temporary civilian government, suspending the constitution and calling for new elections. AP PHOTO/MAYA ALLERUZZO

CAIRO—Following are key developments in Egypt since millions took to the streets Sunday to demand the resignation of Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, leading to his ouster by the army on Wednesday.

SUNDAY, JUNE 30

— Chanting “Leave!” and “the people want the ouster of the regime,” crowds demonstrate across Egypt in response to a call from the grassroots movement Tamarod—Arabic for rebellion.

— In Cairo the protesters gather around the presidential palace and in Tahrir Square, epicenter of Egypt’s 2011 revolution.

— Huge demonstrations also take place in Alexandria, Menouf and Mahallah in the Nile Delta, and in the canal cities of Suez and Port Said.

— The army speaks of “several million” protesters and a military source tells AFP: “It is the biggest protest in Egypt’s history.”

— Morsi supporters rally in the Cairo district of Nasr City. The army puts their numbers at 25,000.

— At least 16 people are killed nationwide, eight during clashes between government supporters and opposition forces outside the Cairo headquarters of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood.

– Morsi calls for dialogue, but Tamarod insists he step down.

MONDAY, JULY 1

— Protesters set fire to the Brotherhood headquarters in Cairo then loot it.

— Tamarod gives Morsi until 1500 GMT on Tuesday July 2 to quit or face an open-ended campaign of civil disobedience.

— The tourism, environment, communications, and judicial and parliamentary affairs ministers resign.

— The army gives Morsi 48 hours to meet the “people’s demands” or face an imposed solution.

— In Tahrir Square, anti-Morsi protesters erupt in joy on hearing the army’s statement.

— Morsi’s office rebuffs the army’s ultimatum.

TUESDAY, JULY 2

— Morsi holds talks with army chief General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

— The National Salvation Front, the main opposition coalition, says it would not support a “military coup” and trusts the army statement does not mean it would assume a political role.

— The spokesmen for the presidency and the cabinet quit.

— Opposition groups choose leading dissident Mohamed ElBaradei to represent them in the negotiations called for by the army.

— Morsi’s opponents pack Tahrir Square, while his backers join a sit-in in the Nasr City neighborhood.

— Clashes between the rival sides leave seven people dead.

— Gunmen kill 16 people and wound 200 others at a Cairo rally supporting Morsi, the health ministry say.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3

— As the army deadline passes, Morsi proposes a consensus government as a way out of the country’s crisis.

— Security forces impose a travel ban on Morsi and several top Islamist allies, security officials say.

— Army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi ousts Morsi and declares the head of the Supreme Constitutional Court caretaker leader.

— Sisi also announces a freezing of the Islamist-drafted constitution and early presidential elections.

— Cairo protesters erupt in joy.

— Morsi denounces the move as “a coup” and in a prerecorded speech says, “I am Egypt’s elected president.”


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Tags: Egypt , Morsi , Politics , Timeline




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