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Beijing to issue new smog data after online outcry



BEIJING – Beijing’s government on Friday bowed to a vocal online campaign for a change in the way air quality is measured in the Chinese capital, one of the world’s most polluted cities.

Authorities said they would start publishing figures this month showing the smallest, most dangerous pollution particles in the air after considering the wishes of residents, expressed on China’s popular microblogs.

The Chinese capital currently bases its air quality information on particles of 10 micrometers or larger, known as PM10, and does not take into account the smaller particulates that experts say are most harmful to human health.

But authorities came under huge pressure to change the system last year when they ranked the air as only slightly polluted, despite thick smog that forced the cancellation of hundreds of flights and triggered a surge in face mask sales.

The local government already measures particles of 2.5 micrometers or less, known as PM2.5, but China’s environment ministry had said the data would not be available nationwide until 2016.

On Friday the Beijing Environmental Bureau said it would provide hourly updates of PM2.5 measure ahead of the Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, which starts on January 23, in response to the flood of public anger.

“The authorities plan to release air-quality monitoring data using PM2.5 before Spring Festival,” a bureau official surnamed Jiang told AFP.

“The government has to consider the pleas of the people, so yes, the anger of Beijing citizens these days is a big contributor to our action.”

Public anger was exacerbated by the discrepancy between the official data and that issued online and on Twitter by the US embassy in Beijing, which conducts its own measures of PM2.5 and frequently registers dangerous pollution levels.

Many bloggers hailed the role of the US embassy in the Beijing government’s apparent change of heart. “The effort of the US embassy should not be ignored,” posted one under the name Kangtou Wang on Sina weibo — China’s biggest microblog.

China has the world’s largest online population, with around half a billion web users, posing a growing challenge to authorities in a country that tightly controls its media.

Although censored, the microblogs are proving to be a highly effective public platform for people to call officials to account and report government or corporate malpractice and other problems.

The public response to the announcement was mixed, with some residents welcoming the move, while others expressed suspicion about the government’s true intentions.

“The trend nowadays is to clean up problems only when they show,” posted one user under the name Qiong Xiaobing on Sina’s weibo.

“We don’t care about data or figures, there’s nothing we can do about pollution even it exceeds the limit,” wrote another Sina weibo user under the name Hebo HB.

“We have already been living like this for decades, we only wish the government would not cheat us.”

Beijing authorities said last month they had met their target of “blue sky” days for 2011, with 274 days of “grade one or two” air quality compared with 252 days in 2010.

But the state-run China Daily has said that if PM2.5 were used as China’s main standard, only 20 percent of Chinese cities would be rated as having satisfactory air quality, against the current 80 percent.

International organisations including the United Nations list Beijing as one of the most polluted cities in the world, mainly due to its growing energy consumption, much of which is still fuelled by coal.


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Tags: China , environment , news , Pollution , smog , world


  • http://twitter.com/ka_marks TheGUM

    The Philippines have 10 or 11 of these coal power plants, and there are plans to build more.  Last April Fool’s Day on April 1, 2011, President Aquino officially opened one of these coal power plants in Iloilo City.  There were noisy protests against these dirty sources of energy, but Aquino went ahead, anyway, and ”blessed” this coal power plant, though to his credit he admitted that there is a need for cleaner forms of energy.  Just words, as usual, since more coal power plants will soon open in other parts of the Philippines.

    Just how dirty are these coal power plants?  According to the Union of Concerned Scientists in the US:

     Burning coal is a leading cause of smog, acid rain, global warming, and air toxics. In an average year, a typical coal plant generates:

    3,700,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2), the primary human cause of global warming–as much carbon dioxide as cutting down 161 million trees.

    10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide (SO2), which causes acid rain that damages forests, lakes, and buildings, and forms small airborne particles that can penetrate deep into lungs.

    500 tons of small airborne particles, which can cause chronic bronchitis, aggravated asthma, and premature death, as well as haze obstructing visibility.

    10,200 tons of nitrogen oxide (NOx), as much as would be emitted by half a million late-model cars. NOx leads to formation of ozone (smog) which inflames the lungs, burning through lung tissue making people more susceptible to respiratory illness.

    720 tons of carbon monoxide (CO), which causes headaches and place additional stress on people with heart disease.

    220 tons of hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (VOC), which form ozone.

    170 pounds of mercury, where just 1/70th of a teaspoon deposited on a 25-acre lake can make the fish unsafe to eat.

    225 pounds of arsenic, which will cause cancer in one out of 100 people who drink water containing 50 parts per billion.

    114 pounds of lead, 4 pounds of cadmium, other toxic heavy metals, and trace amounts of uranium.



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