Dead sea cow washed ashore in Digos City | Inquirer News
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Dead sea cow washed ashore in Digos City

/ 04:38 PM April 06, 2016

DIGOS CITY, Davao del Sur – A 150-kilogram dead sea cow, locally known as “dugong,” was washed ashore in Barangay Aplaya here on Tuesday evening, authorities said Wednesday.

Senior Insp. Renfredo Dacalos, Digos City police operations chief, said on Wednesday that Barangay Aplaya residents retrieved the dead mammal around 9:30 p.m. and called for police assistance.

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Dr. Fermin Verallo, the city veterinary officer, said the result of post-mortem examination led him to believe that the sea cow – which was estimated to be between three and five years old – died of a serious illness.

“Its vital organs showed signs of hemorrhage. There was also a cyst growth in the intestine aside from a lot of parasites, both round worms and tape worms. The lungs and other parts of the system showed abnormality and signs of damage,” Verallo said.

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The sea off Barangay Aplaya here is part of the Davao Gulf, where sea cows are known to thrive.  SFM

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TAGS: Barangay Aplaya, city veterinary officers, cyst growth in sea cows, Davao del Sur, dead sea cow, Digos City, Digos City Police Office, Dr. Fermin Verallo, Dugong, Fermin Verallo, hemorrhage in sea cows, Marine life, marine mammals, News, Regions, sea cow, Senior Insp. Renfredo Dacalos, wildlife, wildlife monitoring, wildlife tracking
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