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SC dismisses bid to stop implementation of K-12 law

/ 03:39 PM March 15, 2016
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The Supreme Court building. INQUIRER FILE PHOTO

The Supreme Court on Tuesday has dismissed the bid of teachers, students, parents and various organizations to stop the implementation of the K-12 Law, a national 12-year basic education program.

Several petitions were filed asking the high court to nullify Republic Act 10533 or the K-12 law.

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READ: Stop K to 12, teachers press Supreme Court

Petitioners against K-12 include Council of Teachers and Staff of Colleges and Universities of the Philippines (CoTeSCUP), Sentro ng mga Nagkakaisang Progresibong mga Manggagawa (SENTRO), Federation of Free Workers (FFW), National Confederation of Labor (NCL), Senator and Vice Presidential aspirant Antonio Trillanes IV and the Magdalo Partylist, the Suspend K-12 Coalition led by Prof. Rene Tadle of the Council of Teachers and staff of Colleges and Universities in the Philippines, National Artists Dr. Bienvenido Lumbera, Representatives Antonio Tinio (ACT Teachers’ Partylist), Neri Colmenares and Carlos Zarate (Bayan Muna Partylist), Emmi De Jesus and Luz Ilagan (Gabriela Partylist), Fernando “Ka Pando” Hicap (Anakpawis Partylist) and Terry Ridon (Kabataan Partylist).

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“The Court denied the prayer for issuance of a temporary restraining order and/or writ of preliminary injunction,” high court’s Information Chief Atty. Theodore Te said at a press conference.

READ: Multi-sectoral group bares discrepancies in K to 12 law

Petitioners asked the high court to strike down Republic Act (RA) No. 10533, also known as An Act Enhancing the Philippine Basic Education System, arguing that it was passed “without massive consultations;” makes education “inaccessible” to all, especially to lower-income Filipinos; and causes the displacement of tens of thousands of teaching and non-teaching personnel.

The high court will continue to weigh in on the petitions and rule on its merits. RAM

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TAGS: basic education program, K-12 Law, SC, Supreme Court
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