Over 4,000 cops deployed to cemeteries in Central Luzon | Inquirer News
Close  

Over 4,000 cops deployed to cemeteries in Central Luzon

/ 11:14 AM October 29, 2021
public cemetery in olongapo

This public cemetery in Olongapo City is closed to visitors during “Undas” to curb the spread of COVID-19. | Photo by Joanna Rose Aglibot

OLONGAPO CITY––The Police Regional Office 3 (PRO3) has deployed more than 4,000 cops in cemeteries, memorial parks, and columbaria in the region to enforce minimum health protocols and ensure the safety of those visiting their departed loved ones.

In a statement Thursday, Oct. 28, Brig. Gen. Valeriano de Leon, Central Luzon police director, said some policemen had been assigned to key areas beginning Oct. 23 since cemeteries are closed from Oct. 29 to Nov. 2.

ADVERTISEMENT

Police visibility in cemeteries would provide security when visits to the graves are allowed, De Leon said.

He said barangay peacekeeping action teams and village watchmen were deputized to patrols on residential areas, business firms, and other areas to thwart criminality.

FEATURED STORIES

“Police assistance desks are already set up in the entry points to control the number of people entering and to ensure that health protocols are observed,” De Leon said.

lzb

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.
Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: cemeteries, columbaria, COPS, health protocols, Memorial Parks, Olongapo City, Police Regional Office 3, PRO3, Regions, Safety
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and
acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.



© Copyright 1997-2022 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.