Close  
At least 212 people killed last year, more than half from PH, Colombia

British think tank flags PH in deadly land conflicts

/ 07:15 AM September 29, 2020

Members of the Nasa indigenous tribe and “Liberation of Mother Earth” movement stand on a sugar cane field they claim as their ancestral lands in Corinto, Colombia, May 11, 2017. Picture taken May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Federico Rios

BANGKOK — At least 212 people were killed last year while defending their land from being taken over by industry, Global Witness said, the deadliest year since the advocacy group began compiling data in 2012.

More than half the killings were in Colombia and the Philippines and indigenous people made up 40% of the victims, the Britain-based group said in a report. It was a significant rise on 2018, when 164 killings were recorded.

ADVERTISEMENT

The threat from mining and large-scale agriculture caused the most number of deaths, with these sectors also responsible for worsening climate change impacts, said Global Witness, whose website describes itself as a group that “campaigns to end environmental and human rights abuses driven by the exploitation of natural resources and corruption in the global political and economic system.”

“Insecure land tenure, irresponsible business practices and government policies that prioritize extractive economies at the cost of human rights are putting people, and their land, at risk,” said Rachel Cox, a campaigner at Global Witness, citing a study made public in July.

FEATURED STORIES

“Land and environmental defenders play a vital role in protecting climate-critical forests and ecosystems. When they take a stand against the theft of their land, or the destruction of forests, they are increasingly being killed,” she said.

Latin America accounted for more than two-thirds of all victims last year, with Colombia the deadliest country of all, with 64 killings.

In Asia, the Philippines had 43 killings compared to 30 the previous year, with six in India, three in Indonesia and one in Cambodia, according to Global Witness.

Many more were attacked, arrested, threatened and sued, said Global Witness, which recorded killings in 21 countries.

In the Philippines – which was the deadliest country in 2018 – “relentless vilification” of activists by the government and impunity for attackers may be spurring an increase in killings, it said.

A spokesman for President Rodrigo Duterte did not respond to requests for comment.

At least 119 activists and farmers have been killed since Duterte took office in 2016, according to Global Witness, while local campaign groups put the figure at about 200.

ADVERTISEMENT

Dozens of United Nations experts last month called for an independent investigation into human rights violations in the Philippines, including killings of farmers and indigenous people.

The coronavirus pandemic has accelerated the “downward spiral of the human rights situation,” and a new anti-terrorism bill could be used to target activists, they said.

“Days after the act was signed, the harassment of human rights defenders has visibly worsened,” said Cristina Palabay, secretary general of Philippine human rights advocacy group Karapatan.

“While rural communities, including indigenous peoples, grapple with the impact of COVID-19, they are constantly hounded by military operations that benefit mining corporations encroaching on their ancestral land,” she said.

Two of the country’s biggest agribusiness brands — Dole Philippines and Del Monte Philippines — earlier this year said they would review their processes to better protect land rights.

But attacks against activists during coronavirus lockdowns signalled more violence worldwide, Cox said.

“Governments around the world have used the crisis to strengthen draconian measures to control citizens and roll back hard-fought environmental regulations,” Cox told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“This a more worrying time than ever.”

Read Next
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: Global Witness, human rights violations, land conflicts, Philippines, President Rodrigo Duterte, United Nations
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2020 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.