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PAO to PNP: Return personal items of ‘shootout’ victim

/ 05:52 PM December 18, 2018

MANILA, Philippines — The Public Attorneys’ Office (PAO) has asked the Philippine National Police (PNP) to return the personal items of Richard Santillan who died in an alleged shootout last Dec. 10.

The request after Santillan’s wife, Jeanette, sought PAO’s help.

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Santillan, the aide of former lawmaker  Glenn Chong, and a woman were killed in an alleged encounter with members of the Philippine National Police – Highway Patrol Group (PNP-HPG) and the police in Cainta, Rizal.

The victims were reportedly onboard a Toyota Fortuner without a validation sticker. Police said Santillan and his group were members of the “Highway Boys,” a crime syndicate engaged in robbery, arms dealing, and illegal drugs.

READ: Lawyer to file murder raps vs police in killing of aide

The PAO’s Forensic Team has conducted a re-autopsy of Santillan’s body. Based on the initial findings, he was found to have sustained 63 wounds—gunshot, lacerations, stabs. There were also contusions in different parts of his body, including his head.

In ta letter addressed to PNP Chief Oscar Albayalde, the PAO, through Deputy Chief Public Attorney Silvestre Mosing, asked that the police to return the personal items of Santillan, which include a mobile phone, shirts, pants, and slippers.

Mosing also asked the PNP Chief to provide them a copy of the documents executed by the operatives led by Senior Inspector Russel Barnachea. /ee

READ: Ex-lawmaker’s aide tortured before ‘shootout,’ says PAO forensic team 

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TAGS: news, PAO, Philippines, PNP‎, Richard Santillan
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