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DLSU resumes classes after 10-day suspension

By Anna Valmero
INQUIRER.net
First Posted 18:23:00 06/15/2009

Filed Under: Education, Swine Flu, Epidemic and Plague, Health, Diseases

MANILA, Philippines?The De La Salle University (DLSU) in Manila reopened Monday after a 10-day suspension of classes prompted by the spread of the influenza A(H1N1) virus that downed 55 of its students, an official said.

?Some of the 55 students of DLSU Manila, including five foreign students, who were tested positive for H1N1 and were cleared from the flu virus after treatment, are now attending classes in our campus, with the rest of the cases on their way to recovery,? said Armin Luistro, president and chancellor of DLSU Manila.

?Today as DLSU re-opens, no one is wearing masks or passing under thermal scanners?we feel the campus is a healthy and safe environment,? said Luistro. ?Alongside this, we are launching our campus-wide campaign to fight the misinformation about the H1N1 flu virus.?

The DLSU administration ordered on June 4 a 10-day suspension of classes after one of its Japanese exchange students tested positive for the A(H1N1) virus.

Luistro said that persons who were previously infected of H1N1 should not be ostracized because after undergoing treatment, they could no longer infect others due to the ?self-limiting nature of the virus.?

Health Undersecretary Mario Villaverde said those treated from the virus gain ?some immunity.?

?Magkakasakit ba ulit 'yung mga nagkaroon na at gumaling sa H1N1 (Will those who were infected of the H1N1 virus and had recovered be re-infected again),? Villaverde said.

?There is a certain level of immunity that these treated persons gain but that is not characterized as to how long the immunity is because the virus is still evolving. If the virus mutates into a more lethal form, then there is a potential those [treated from H1N1] will get re-infected,? he said.

The Philippines has reported a total of 147 confirmed cases of swine flu, but no deaths so far.



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