Quantcast
Article Index |Advertise | Mobile | RSS | Wireless | Newsletter | Archive | Corrections | Syndication | Contact us | About Us| Services
 
  Breaking News :    
Advertisement
Inquirer Mobile
Property Guide

INQUIRER ALERT
Get the free INQUIRER newsletter
Enter your email address:

 
Breaking News / World Type Size: (+) (-)
You are here: Home > News > Breaking News > World

  ARTICLE SERVICES      
     Reprint this article     Print this article  
    Send Feedback  
    Post a comment   Share  

  RELATED STORIES  




imns



China keeps tight lid on riot-hit areas

Reporters turned back


Agence France-Presse
First Posted 13:14:00 03/24/2008

Filed Under: Civil unrest, Media

KANGDING, China -- China kept a tight lid across a huge swathe of riot-hit regions bordering Tibet on Monday, with a heavy security presence denying foreign reporters access.

An Agence France-Presse (AFP) reporter in western Sichuan province was prevented from moving out of the town of Kangding into restive Tibetan-populated regions on Monday.

Taxi drivers in the area said they had been ordered by police and the military not to drive westward out of the town.

A day earlier, the AFP reporter had traveled up into the now blocked regions, seeing more than 100 military vehicles, at least two military camps and dozens of police cars swarming the remote, mountainous region.

The Tibetan-populated region is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) south of Ngawa county, where Tibetan Buddhist monks clashed with police a week ago.

China has said four "rioters" were shot and wounded in that violence, while pro-Tibet groups say eight protesters were confirmed shot and killed, and the number of dead may have been much higher.

Those protests broke out in response to widespread rioting in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa on March 14, in the biggest challenge to Chinese control of the Himalayan region in two decades.

In Qinghai province, which neighbors Sichuan and Tibet, an AFP reporter on Sunday was turned back at a police checkpoint while trying to reach Jianzha, a village where the London-based Free Tibet Campaign reported a protest a day earlier by 1,000 Tibetan monks and lay people.

On Saturday, the same correspondent was turned back trying to reach Takster, the birthplace of exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, which is in Qinghai.

When shown a copy of new media regulations that are meant to give greater freedoms to foreign journalists in the run-up to the Beijing Olympics, a police officer near Takster said: "We don't agree with that."

China has prevented foreign media from independently verifying its claims that the exiled Dalai Lama orchestrated the violence and China's assertions it has responded to the unrest with minimal force.



Copyright 2014 Agence France-Presse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Share

RELATED STORIES:

OTHER STORIES:



  ^ Back to top

© Copyright 2001-2014 INQUIRER.net, An INQUIRER Company

The INQUIRER Network: HOME | NEWS | SPORTS | SHOWBIZ & STYLE | TECHNOLOGY | BUSINESS | OPINION | GLOBAL NATION | Site Map
Services: Advertise | Buy Content | Wireless | Newsletter | Low Graphics | Search / Archive | Article Index | Contact us
The INQUIRER Company: About the Inquirer | User Agreement | Link Policy | Privacy Policy

Advertisement
Megaworld
TAGAYTAY FONTAINE VILLAS
Radio on Inquirer.net
Pacquiao