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TIT-FOR-TAT THREAT

Palace dismisses insurgents’ soldier-a-day kill warning

/ 07:08 AM February 06, 2018

Malacañang on Monday dismissed the warning of exiled Communist Party of the Philippines founder Jose Ma. Sison that the New People’s Army (NPA) was ready to kill one soldier a day to force the government to revive stalled peace talks.

Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque said the government would not bow down to Sison’s demand and warned that the NPA would be committing “kidnapping” if it arrested government peace negotiators.

“We will not kneel … They (communist peace negotiators) were given free passes and sent to Norway, all expenses paid, (but) they continued to kill soldiers,” Roque said. “Go ahead, (let Sison) make all the threats he wants.”

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The military was also cool to Sison’s threat.

“With or without threat to the lives of our soldiers, our troops will be there for our people in the communities where they are most needed,” said Col. Edgard Arevalo, spokesperson for the Armed Forces of the Philippines.

Anakpawis Rep. Ariel Casilao on Saturday said the arrest of communist peace consultant Rafael Baylosis might prompt the NPA to capture government negotiators and consultants. —Reports from Philipe C. Tubeza and Nikko Dizon

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TAGS: CPP, Harry Roque, Joma Sison, Jose Maria Sison, NPA attacks, Philippine peace talks
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