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CBCP’s Caritas asks faithful to pray for a better PH this 2018

/ 11:59 AM January 01, 2018

Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (INQUIRER FILE PHOTO)

May 2018 spur and encourage Filipinos to help stamp out poverty, illegal drugs and human trafficking, and at the same time uphold life and human rights.

This was the appeal of the social action arm of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines as it reminded the people that there is still hope despite the challenges in the past year.

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The National Secretariat for Social Action, also known as Caritas Philippines, urged Filipinos to “pray and work for a Philippines prosperous in human and spiritual values.”

Caceres archbishop and NASSA national director Rolando Tria Tirona appealed to the faithful to be “a citizenry bold enough to do what is morally right.”

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Tirona’s call centered on fighting poverty, corruption, illegal rights and human trafficking, as well as “upholding human rights and the sacredness of life.”

The prelate also prayed that Filipinos will be “enlightened to choose worthy leaders” and that the country become “a Philippines proud of its heritage, yet open to the family of nations.”

He noted that the country faced many challenges and trials in 2017, such as the several typhoons which hit the Philippines – but the Filipinos’ resiliency shone through.

“Despite the many environmental struggles we have faced, our efforts to protect the environment especially against mining have been sustained and produced positive results,” he said.

And even with the thousands of deaths from the government’s bloody war against illegal drugs, the Church stood for its principles in upholding the sacredness of life.

“The anti-drug campaign has endeavored us to stand up for life and uphold human rights,” Tirona said.

Tirona however reminded the faithful that there is still hope despite the dreariness of life, especially with viral social media posts of people doing good deeds.

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“This is what we need to spread. Instead of negative news and hate, let us make it a habit to share the good news, and do good things no matter how small. From hope, we can make love, compassion and Caritas viral in our homes,” he said.

CBCP president and Davao archbishop Romulo Valles had a similar message highlighting hope for the New Year, despite the tragedies and darkness of the world.

“We can begin a New Year because of what we celebrate in the Christmas mystery. We do so filled with hope. A hope that endures in the darkness of our world,” he said in his New Year message.

This 2018, the prelate reminded Catholics to turn to the Virgin Mary for aid and intercession “that we may be living witnesses of hope… that light has overcome the darkness.”

Aside from being the first day of the New Year, Catholics celebrate January 1 as the Feast of the Solemnity of Mary as the Mother of God.

“In the midst of tragedies, man-made and natural, in the midst of the inhumanity present in the world today, in the midst of heartless terrorism, in the midst of sinfulness, we have the confidence that Mary accompanies us in the midst of darkness and she leads us to hope,” Tirona added. /jpv

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TAGS: 2018, Caritas, CBCP, Hope, Human rights, New Year, Poverty
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