Quantcast

Marantan: I am the collateral damage

By |


The police officer who led the intelligence operation against alleged “jueteng” operator Victor Siman felt that his superiors in the Philippine National Police had turned their backs on him after the reported encounter that left 13 people dead in Atimonan town in Quezon on Jan. 6.

“I am the collateral damage,” Supt. Hansel Marantan said when controversy began to rage after the killings.

“With this kind of investigation, I am not happy [about it],” Marantan told the Philippine Daily Inquirer Tuesday by his bedside at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Taguig City, where he was brought for treatment of bullet wounds he sustained in the Atimonan encounter.

Marantan, 42, was among those behind Coplan (case operation plan) “Armado” on which the operation was based and was the ground commander in a team of 41 policemen and Army soldiers involved in the reported gun battle. He insisted that Siman’s group was flagged down at a legitimate checkpoint.

Siman, according to the coplan, was an operator of  illegal gambling and leader of a private armed group in Southern Tagalog.

PAOCC funding

The plan was submitted to the Presidential Anti-Organized Crime Commission (PAOCC) headed by Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr., Marantan said, along with a request to release P900,000 (not P300,000 as earlier reported) as funding support.

The PAOCC board, he added, approved the fund release and in fact already gave his group P100,000 after the November operation in Calamba City in Laguna province.

The PAOCC said the request was disapproved. Marantan, however, insisted that the operation would proceed even if the release of funds was stopped.

“Instead of talking to the members of the operating team, what did our commanding officers do? They listened to the media and then said it was a rubout. Did they even talk to us?” Marantan said in Filipino.

“Those of us on the ground, we get hurt, too,” he said, referring to initial reports from the PNP fact-finding committee.

The families of some of the fatalities have claimed that their loved ones included legitimate businessmen and an environmentalist.

Character assassination

Also on Tuesday, a former “hit man” of Siman who later became Marantan’s informant, said all those slain in Atimonan were involved either as middleman or negotiator for Siman.

“The only people who might not have been involved [in the bookies operations] were the three drivers and bodyguards,” said the informant, who spoke on condition of anonymity. He was referring to Conrado Decillo, Gerry Siman and Leonardo Marasigan, who were distant relatives of Siman.

Marantan said he was a victim of “character assassination,” pointing out that his previous cases had tainted the ongoing investigation. He and Supt. Glenn Dumlao, who was the case coordinator of Armado, were implicated in past cases of police rubouts.

Chief Supt. James Melad, the regional director who approved the operation plan, was relieved from his post on Tuesday.

Only he, Melad, Dumlao and three other intelligence officers in the Calabarzon knew about it because of the “sensitivity” of the case, Marantan said. The case, he pointed out, involved a mayor in Batangas and other police officers believed to be on the take from illegal gambling.


Follow Us


Recent Stories:

Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Tags: Alfredo Consemino , Atimonan 13 , Crime , DoJ , gambling , Government , Hansel Marantan , Illegal drugs , Jueteng , Military , NBI , Police , Quezon Province , Quezon shootout , Regions , Vic Siman




Copyright © 2014, .
To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.
Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate:
c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94
Advertisement
Advertisement
Marketplace
Advertisement