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This Christmas will be no different–survey

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05:22 AM December 18th, 2012

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December 18th, 2012 05:22 AM

Most Filipinos see this Christmas season to be just like last year’s but are optimistic about the new year, the latest Pulse Asia survey showed.

The results of the survey released Monday showed that 56 percent of the 1,200 adult respondents nationwide said their Christmas this year would be no different from the previous year’s.

“Despite the reported growth in the national economy, most Filipinos (56 percent) expect this year’s Christmas celebration to be the same as the one their families had last year,” Pulse Asia said.

Surpassing expectations, the Philippine economy, as measured by the gross domestic product (GDP),  grew by 7.1 percent in the third quarter from 3.2 percent in the same period last year.

Year-to-date, the GDP has expanded 6.5 percent with services and industry (except mining) still the main engine of growth.

Only three out of 10 Filipinos, or 34 percent, believed their Christmas would be more prosperous while 10 percent said it would be poorer.

Except in the Visayas, majority of the respondents in all geographic areas (52 percent to 62 percent) and socioeconomic classes (51 percent to 58 percent) echoed the national sentiment that this Christmas would be no different.

In the Visayas, almost the same percentages said this Christmas would either be the same (47 percent) or more prosperous (41 percent).

Pulse Asia noted that there were no significant differences between the 2011 and 2012 figures on Christmas expectations.

The survey conducted on Nov. 23-29 used face-to-face interviews and had a margin of error of  plus or minus three percentage points.

Looking forward to 2013, nine in 10 Filipinos, or 92 percent, said they would greet the new year with hope, a view held across all geographic areas (90 percent to 96 percent) and socioeconomic classes (89 to 96 percent).

While being optimistic is an inherent trait of Filipinos, Cid Terosa of the University of Asia and the Pacific believes that more families and individuals are beginning to see positive indications of a better life.

“The confidence of many in the Aquino administration has generated a positive attitude towards future challenges,” Terosa said in a text message.

Only 3 percent said they would face the year ahead with apprehension while 4 percent said they would welcome 2013 without hope and without apprehension.

The figures on the prospects for the new year are consistent with the results last year. Ana Roa, Inquirer Research

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