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New storm brings misery in New York, New Jersey

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A homeless woman sits on the Coney Island boardwalk, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012 in New York. Residents of New York and New Jersey who were flooded out by Superstorm Sandy waited with dread Wednesday and heard warnings to evacuate for the second time in two weeks as another, weaker storm spun toward them and threatened to inundate their homes again or simply leave them shivering in the dark for even longer. AP

NEW YORK— Coastal residents of New York and New Jersey faced new warnings to evacuate their homes and airlines canceled hundreds of flights as a new storm arrived Wednesday, only a week after Superstorm Sandy left dozens dead and millions without power.

Forecasters said the latest storm appeared weaker than first thought, but it still brought high winds, rain and wet snow that caused further damage to an already weakened infrastructure of the country’s most densely populated region. Rain and wet snow started falling in New York City around midday, with the worst expected in the afternoon.

Mark L. Fendrick, of Staten Island, tweeted Wednesday night: “My son had just got his power back 2 days ago now along comes this nor’easter and it’s out again.”

Exactly as authorities feared, the nor’easter brought down tree limbs and electrical wires, and utilities in New York and New Jersey reported that nearly 60,000 customers who lost power because of Sandy lost it all over again as a result of the nor’easter.

“I am waiting for the locusts and pestilence next,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said. Public works crews with heavy machinery worked to build up dunes to protect the battered shoreline.

More than half a million homes and businesses remained without power as temperatures hit freezing at night, and finding tens of thousands of people emergency housing — in some cases, for the long term — was the greatest challenge.

The utility Con Ed, which serves New York City, said that by early evening, the nor’easter knocked out power to at least 11,000 customers, some of whom had just gotten it back. Tens of thousands more were expected to lose power overnight.

The Long Island Power Authority said by evening that the number of customers in the dark had risen from 150,000 to more than 198,000.

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered police to use loudspeakers to warn vulnerable residents, many of them in low-income public housing, about evacuating.

“Even though it’s not anywhere near as strong as Sandy — nor strong enough, in normal times, for us to evacuate anybody — out of precaution and because of the changing physical circumstances, we are going to go to some small areas and ask those people to go to higher ground,” Bloomberg said Tuesday.

But many were deciding to stay, worried about their empty homes being looted. Others decided the situation couldn’t get much worse.

“We’re petrified,” said James Alexander, a resident of the hard-hit Rockaways section of New York City where many homes burned to the ground during Sandy. “It’s like a sequel to a horror movie.” Nevertheless, he said he was staying to watch over his house and his neighbors.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency put a number to the storm’s homeless in New York and New Jersey, saying 95,000 people were eligible for emergency housing assistance. Just under a million people were still without power in the region.

Storm surges along the coasts of New Jersey and New York were expected to reach perhaps 3 feet (0.9 meters), only half to a third of what the hurricane-driven Sandy caused last week. But Sandy destroyed some protective dunes, especially in New Jersey, making even a weaker surge dangerous.

High winds, which could reach 65 mph (104 kph), could stall power restoration efforts or cause further outages.

Major airlines cancelled flights in and out of the New York City area ahead of the storm. Sandy last week led to more than 20,000 flight cancellations.

New York City was closing all parks, playgrounds and beaches and ordering all construction sites to be secured. Tuesday evening, Bloomberg ordered three nursing homes and an adult care facility evacuated from Queens’ vulnerable Rockaway Peninsula.

New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said it wasn’t wise to stay put. “I think your life is more important than property,” he said.

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Contributing to this report were Associated Press writers Malcolm Ritter, Eileen AJ Connelly and Jennifer Peltz in New York and Larry Neumeister and Frank Eltman on Long Island.


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Tags: New Jersey , new storm , New York , superstorm `sandy’ , Weather




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