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Why Cebu Pacific doesn’t use airbridge

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01:34 AM March 24th, 2012

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By: Ramon Tulfo, March 24th, 2012 01:34 AM

WHEN this corner criticized Cebu Pacific Airways on Thursday for letting  its passengers go down the plane stairs, and then climb up the airbridge from the tarmac when it could have made them use the airport tube, I was flooded with reactions from passengers.

One text message came from my friend, Louie Rabat, a regular Manila-Davao City commuter.

“Just read your column re Cebu Pacific not using d airbridge. I hope u can help us persuade (airline) to use airbridge for the convenience of passengers. We have brought the matter to d attention of Regional Development Council, Region XI (based in Davao City), pero matigas ang ulo (hard-headed) ng Cebu Pacific.

“(Airline) earned 3B (billion) last year, pero ayaw magbayad (but doesn’t want to pay) P7,000 for the use of airbridge.

“Isa pa itong (Another pain in the neck is) Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (which manages all airports in the country). We should not pay them P200 terminal fee if it can’t require Cebu Pacific to use airbridge.”

* * *

I was handed a letter from Fe Pilar del Rosario, a private representative for disabled persons and senior citizens, addressed to Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte, chair of the Regional Development Council (Region XI).

Part of Del Rosario’s letter read: “The non-use of airbridge creates difficulty for mothers with young children and passengers with hand luggage. Travelers are also exposed to bad weather conditions.

* * *

I was told the Gokongwei family, which owns Cebu Pacific, is scrimping on money earned from fares, that’s why they dispense with the use of the airbridge or tube which costs P7,000 per flight.

In short, they are kuripot  (tightwad), at the expense of their passengers.

* * *

The Land Transportation Office should stop the continued use of commemorative plates for private cars.

Those plates don’t serve any purpose except to tell the world that  the owner of the car is a member of an elite group, such as the Philippine Military Academy, Philippine National Police or National Bureau of Investigation.

In short, its owner just wants to show off.

Owners who attach commemorative plates to their cars—NBI’s 75th year, for example—expect they won’t be apprehended for traffic violations.

In other words, the plates are used to commit crime, albeit minor.

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